Malaysia Uncut

A Repository of Malaysian Stuff and More

Malaysia to introduce RFID number plates

Keep Car Thieves Out (mymalaysia)

THE ROAD TRANSPORT Department of Malaysia is set to introduce RFID licence plates in a bid, it says, to stop car thieves thieving cars. Each plate will contain information about the vehicle and its owner which means that coppers can scan cars at roadblocks and see if the car has been stolen.

Data Protection Laws Around the World (mymalaysia)

 

Currently your average car tea leaf will swap the licence plate when they nick a motor, however this might not be such a good idea if they have RFID plates. Not only will the data have to match the plate but the owner of the car should be nearby in case the copper wants to check the driver’s identity. According to the New Straits Times, the system will be implemented next year in stages with new cars being the first to sport them followed by older vehicles.

 

Also, from now on, the font and size of letters and numbers will be standardised on the e-plate, a spokesman told the paper. So e-plates like Li77l3 Kn08 may not be so sought after. Of course if your RFID system breaks down you could find yourself pulled from your car by a few coppers who think you might have stolen your own car.

 

The plate itself will receive a few minor aesthetic changes, but the integrated microchip is where the rubber hits the road; only authorized mechanics will be able to actually install the plates, and the microchip onboard will house information about the vehicle’s model, make, and even driver information. The e-plate, as it’s so aptly named, has already quelled theft in Japan (and hit Britain, too), and the RTD hopes that Kuala Lumpur will see the same drops in crime as the new plates make things much more difficult for carjackers since swapping out the plates won’t exactly bypass security. The RTD’s director-general has already set the implementation in motion, aiming to equip “new cars” first, while “older” (read: less desirable) whips will get the RFID treatment later on.

 

Sources:

The Inquirer

Engadget

 

Related Topic:

Privacy International – Malaysia Country Report

Saturday, December 16, 2006 - Posted by | News

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